Add a Dash of Backsplash
August 05, 2014

Do you think your bathroom or kitchen is missing a certain something? Are you looking for a relatively easy, cost-effective way to jazz it up? Perhaps we’re biased, but a backsplash is a great answer. It doesn’t just add color- it totally shifts the focal point of the room, making it feel like an entirely new space. It’s also possible to find product to suit any décor style. If your taste leans towards the dramatic, a glass blend mosaic would probably do the trick to add the perfect splash of flair:

Convinced that a backsplash is your ideal solution to a lackluster kitchen? Fantastic! Here are some tips on how to plan one out using typical measurements and points of reference.


How do I Plan a Backsplash?

Start by visualizing it. It’s usually best to center the backsplash behind a sink or a cooktop- there must be a focal point. Once the focal point has been determined, use graph paper to plan around outlets, cabinets, windows and appliances. Though the backsplash should cater to your specific requirements (factor in the practical uses of your kitchen, any storage needs, and physical capabilities of those using the space), the average backsplash is about 15”-18” high- the height from the counter to the base of the upper wall cabinets.

How do I calculate square footage?

When installing tile, you will be measuring the required coverage using square feet. This entails measuring the length of the space (in feet) and multiplying it by the width (in feet). If you are tiling more than one room and require a combined number of square feet, simply measure the square footage of each space individually and add them together.


How much overage should I purchase for my project?

We highly recommend purchasing 10% more tile than the exact calculated square footage. This is to account for cuts, possible breakage, and any future repairs needed- if you need to touch it up later on, the tile may not be available, or what we have may not match your current installation.

When purchasing your tile, please make sure to note the square footage per box or sheet. They aren’t usually split into an even number of square feet so it’s important to know how much you need.


To calculate your total (including recommended overage), follow this example:

If your backsplash area is 10 feet x 3 feet, you have 30 square feet that need coverage. Move the decimal point over once to the left- that’s 3, which is 10% of 30- and then add that number onto the square footage. You would need to purchase 33 square feet of tile in order to meet your requirements plus to recommended overage.

An advantage to having some leftover tile… maybe you can make your backsplash a little bigger than originally planned!